Maps / History of Nebiliv Ukraine region

These maps help to narrow down where Nebiliv, Ukraine is located. This is the town where my grandfather Anton Iwanciwsky first came from.

Ukrainian Map

Ukrainian Map

I then had to go manually searching around a Mapquest map to track down the town! The town of Nebiliv is about 20 miles straight west of Ivano-Frankivsk. However to get there you have to go around a fairly large mountain / hill. Nebiliv is just south of the town of Perehins'ke. According to Mapquest the town's name is "Nebyliv".

Click on any image to see it at full size. Note the Carpathian mountains along the left side of each image! Nebiliv is nestled in its eastern foothills. In the first two images the town is too small to appear by name so I put a dot on it.

Nebiliv Map

Nebiliv Map

In the next two images we are finally at a zoom level where you can see the town's name. It's in the center of the map. The nearby main towns of Kolomaya and Ivano-Frankivsk are no longer visible.

Nebiliv Map

Nebiliv Map

In this final zoom level Mapquest does not show town names or streets any more. There is no closer zoom beyond this.

Nebiliv Map

Ukrainians from Nebiliv are famous for moving to Manitoba in 1891: "... the first Ukrainian settlers [4] came to Canada in the year 1891. It is probable that some had entered the country before that date, but so far we possess no authentic record of such. The earliest available records reveal that Ivan Pillipiw and Wasyl Eleniak were on board the steamship Oregon which had left Liverpool on August 28, 1891 and landed at Montreal on September 7. ... Both of these hardy Ukrainian farmers came from Nebiliv, a village comprising some six hundred homes on the eastern foothills of the Carpathian mountains, in Galicia, which at the time was under the rule of the Habsburgs." Apparently their success encouraged many other Nebiliv residents to come to join them.

Ukrainians in Manitoba
Ukrainians in Manitoba (same story, different site)

From Randy:
"Uncle Walter mentioned that Peter decended from the Wasyl Eleniak, I am not exactly sure of the connection. He, (Eleniak), left Nebyliv with Ivan Pillipiw in the fall of 1891. This information is from a book I have called ""For Our Children" by Peter Shostak. The spelling of "Nebyliv: was found in the book also."

From Wally:
"These maps are interesting as I can see Perehins'ke. Years ago my parents had a friend spent time with us in the summer and they knew him from the "old country". He was from Perehins'ke, a village across the river from Nebyliv. I am not familiar with the photo of Basil ( "B" in Ukrainian is "V") which would mean Vasil or Bill (William) Iwanciwski. It is interesting that on my birth certificate my name is spelled Iwanciwsky. I recall my dad was not always happy with the Canadian translation to Iwanciwski. He always said that he was Ukrainian and not Polish. My brothers birth certificate shows he was born in Poland. (I believe the Ukraine was still under Polish rule at that time). ??"

Photo from Nebiliv


Relatives near Nebiliv
Main Ukrainian Heritage Page